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Film-Philosophy Conference 2014

Film-Philosophy Conference 2014

homepageImage_en_USAfter returning from a month and a half long visit to Scotland at the beginning of the year, I was back on the plane to Glasgow for the 2014 Film-Philosophy Conference, held during the first week of July.

Jet lag hit me hard this time around. I arrived the day before the start of the conference, not anticipating the adverse effect such an abrupt interruption in my normal rhythms would have. I was unable to sleep my first night in Scotland, and as a result I operated in a haze the following day until I was able to slip back to my accommodations out in the suburbs (a subway and a train ride away) to catch up on my sleep that afternoon. Over the course of the week, I struggled with a disrupted sleep cycle that only settled down once the weekend commenced and the talks had come to an end. In the future I’ll try to arrive a few days early to ensure that my old bones can cope with this sort of annoying reality about international travel.

The atmosphere at the Film-Philosophy meeting was different from most US philosophy conferences I have attended. First of all, as might be expected in Europe, the vast majority of presentations were in the Continental tradition, with the ideas of thinkers such as Deleuze, Heidegger, Sartre, Nietzsche and Badiou playing the most prominent roles. While I admit that it is precisely with such thinkers that my greatest interests lie, I must also confess that there were points at which I began to sympathize with some of the complaints voiced by my Anglo-American/Analytic friends concerning the obscurity of much Continental thought. At some of the talks I wasn’t sure if the effects of jet lag were interfering with my comprehension, if I was stupid, if the presenters were being unclear, or if the ideas being discussed were just very difficult. There was probably a bit of all four of these things going on, to tell the truth. Nonetheless, it was good to feel like I was being challenged with new and sometimes unfamiliar ideas.

A welcome surprise was how polite the attendees were with one another. Every comment made by audience members was prefaced with thanks and appreciative remarks to the speakers. There were no personal attacks or hostilities at any of the sessions I attended; things which are, unfortunately, not uncommon at many US philosophy conferences. Hostile verbal abuse became so bad at US conferences that at one point there was an official plea from the offices of the American Philosophical Association imploring its members to remain civil and tolerant with one another at meetings! In fact, the first time that I myself ever delivered a paper in the US, I was angrily attacked by a couple of men in the audience who heartily agreed with one another that I was both a racist and a sexist due to my interpretation of Nietzsche’s philosophy. Ironically, it was a group of women philosophers who came to my defense during that episode. (A funny side note is that the following year I was on a panel with one of my attackers who did not even remember me!) In any case, there was none of that sort of nonsense at the Film-Philosophy conference, where the atmosphere was quite friendly and welcoming.

One criticism I have concerns a number of the speakers, some of whom should have been more organized and prepared to operate in the time-frame scheduled for them. Most of the panel participants had 20 minutes for the reading of their papers while the various keynote speakers had over an hour to deliver their addresses. It was unfortunate that quite a few of the participants tried to cram too much information into their talks and thus found themselves editing their presentations as they went along. This was complicated by the fact that a lot of them also wanted to show film clips; something that was not always possible within the time constraints. The chairmen and chairwomen of the sessions were pretty good at enforcing time limits; however this resulted in presentations that sometimes ended up a bit fragmented and rushed.

I was part of a panel titled “Globalized Myths of Anywhere and Elsewhere.” Lucy Bolton, from the Queen Mary University of London, was the session chair, and Tiago De Luca, from the University of Liverpool, kicked things off with his paper “Humanity as Allegory in the Multi-Narrative Film.” His presentation analyzed films such as Babel, The Edge of Heaven and Amores Perros, all of which contain multiple, parallel, but only loosely connected narratives. His argument was that this sort of narrative structure reflects current trends in globalization in which people worldwide find their lives intertwined in ways that can lead both to meaningful connection and to a sense of passive fatalism. Andre Fischer, from Stanford University, continued the session with his paper “Mythic Thinking in Werner Herzog’s new grammar of images,” in which he drew on the ideas of Nietzsche to suggest that Herzog’s films express a Dionysian leap into the abyss, and the attempt to create a “grammar of images” that offers a mythic response to our modern malaise. I concluded the session with my paper “The Myth of Scotland as Nowhere in Particular,” in which I applied Heideggerian insights concerning art to an analysis of movies filmed in Scotland. I argued that there is currently an emerging cinematic countermovement against past Scottish mythologizing that I call “the myth of Scotland as nowhere in particular.” In this new “myth,” Scotland is used as a setting for dramas that downplay traditional Scottish stereotypes, evoking worlds that could be anywhere at any time.

Our session went well, and afterwards there was an interesting, friendly conversation among the participants and the audience. I had a really good time and met some very interesting people with whom I hope to remain in contact.

A particularly interesting session was conducted later that afternoon by Laura U. Marks, from Simon Fraser University. Her keynote speech, “A World of Flowing, Intensifying Images: Mulla Sadra Meets Cinema Studies,” addressed issues in Islamic philosophy and applied them to film analysis. Marks focused on the idea of the “imaginal realm,” which is developed in the works of the Persian philosopher Mulla Sadra. Islam is often thought to be hostile to the use of images and representations, but Marks argued that this is not always the case. In Shi’ite Islam there is a great degree of tolerance for the use of images that are believed (in a Platonic way) to be capable of functioning as conduits for the Truth. In the writings of Mulla Sadra, the concept of the “imaginal realm” – a realm of imagery existing halfway between the illusions of the senses and the absolute Truths of the eternal Forms – offers a way of thinking about filmic representations that grants them a role in the human aspiration toward ultimate reality. This was fascinating stuff.

DARK-LIGHT-SCREENING_Poster2-160x160I began the last day of the conference by attending a screening of the film Dark Light, at which the filmmaker, Maria O’Connor, was present to discuss her work. The film consists of a 70 minute montage of horse imagery overlayed with an audio track in German, French and Italian. The audio consists of enigmatic utterances referencing thinkers such as Nietzsche, Heidegger and Badiou, provoking viewers to consider the relationship between humanity and animality. Alongside images of horses being groomed and galluping we hear about Nietzsche’s collapse as he protectively threw his arms around a horse that was being beaten by its owner. There are references to Heidegger’s views on how animals don’t “die,” but simply “expire.” All of this raises questions in the viewers mind: What is the difference between how a human and a horse experiences the world? Are horses aware of death? What sort of spiritual bond exists between horses and humans? I found myself a bit befuddled by the film, and I confessed to O’Connor that I felt “discombobulated” after watching it. She laughed and seemed to be pleased with this reaction. On the first day of the conference she had been on a panel where she made comments about how her film experiments with ideas about the withdrawl of Being, and with ideas about how Being is revealed through the lives of children. As I later reflected on these thoughts it shed some light – even if

The Nihilist Void

homepageImage_en_USAfter returning from a month and a half long visit to Scotland at the beginning of the year, I was back on the plane to Glasgow for the 2014 Film-Philosophy Conference, held during the first week of July.

Jet lag hit me hard this time around. I arrived the day before the start of the conference, not anticipating the adverse effect such an abrupt interruption in my normal rhythms would have. I was unable to sleep my first night in Scotland, and as a result I operated in a haze the following day until I was able to slip back to my accommodations out in the suburbs (a subway and a train ride away) to catch up on my sleep that afternoon. Over the course of the week, I struggled with a disrupted sleep cycle that only settled down once the weekend commenced and the talks had come to an…

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Beautiful Ankara fashion Stylish Designs

If you look everywhere especially on a big occasion days, you must see people wearing beautiful Ankara fashion clothing with different designs. The truth is people especially African women are getting stylishly adventurous by the quality of the designs of their Ankara dresses. No wonder, most of these women are looking charming and glittering all over the places from party gathering, to churches, to wedding, social events, and all other celebrations of life with their best Ankara fashion design.
One good thing about all these beautiful Ankara attire is that they are readily available, affordable and inexpensive; you can always find your size in term of monetary value, give it to your designer and let them do their job base on your specification, then you’re ready to rock your world and feel special with your beautiful Ankara clothing. If you like these Ankara fashion stylish designs, please show love by sharing with your friends on the Facebook . Thanks
Don’t get bored, here are the collections of nice Ankara fashion design

 

 

Bright Faces Of our make-up Artist to reckon with

Make-up is no more a thing to joke with nowadays; its a thing most people (couple, celebrities, e.t.c) will pay huge money on to get make-up make-over. Thank God for the likes of Tara Fela-Durotoye, who has really been such an inspiration to new comers in it. Others who have calve a niche for themselves too are Ewar, Lise, e.t.c. However, there are upcoming intake who are really trying their best in making this their first love in the make-up industry stronger and fun. So we @DistinctFH is giving them voice, knowing fully well that they are not alone and we do appreciate their effort.

Olabisi Adewara, Director Oleku Makeup and this is what she said in an interview. “Makeup has been in existence for a while but its gaining multiple acceptance here in Nigeria. there are lots of fashionable Nigerians coupled with the entertainment industry,its pace is unimaginable. I just believe that passion,boldness,knowledge and quest will keep you going in this industry, you just have to be on your toes,be well-informed and up to date. I stand for integrity,dexterity and boldness…wit these,d sky is just ur starting point. What I’ll like to change is some people’s perception of makeup…some people think its child’s play but I tell you it can be as serious as a medical doctor wit his patient… What is what doing is what doing well, Olabisi is sure a force to reckon with in the make-up industry, she’s got guts and very good at what she does.

*KILO ABIOLA FRANCIS: A graduate of History and International Studies from Ekiti State University. Last from a family of 4 kids, hail from Ogun state. Abiola stated in an interview with us @DistinctFH saying “a lot of people think he bumped into the beauty industry, but no, he had passion for making them comfortable in their own skin”. His brand N & D (Night & Day) artistry started 2 years now and waxing stronger having been worked with lots of celebrities and at big events. He also agreed that the industry is better now and getting larger, but his fear is “I wouldn’t want it to be like nollywood, where even people with no passion for beauty just comes in because of the pay or whatever their reasons are”. Abiola is known for quality make-up like d likes of Tara and Banke Meshida. His vison is having his own make-up products and also rising to the level of competing with other countries in Africa. What can we say? Abiola, wishing you strength and power to move on. Follow Abiola on twitter @kilo2k7

Adenike Dada is the CEO Exquisite Touch Make-over, also a mother of one cute boy. A bio-science degree holder. Make-up started with her as a passion and grew to be her work for a living now. After school, she went to a make up school (DEN ACADEMY) to be a professional. Nike is also into facilitating youth empowerment programme to help raise individual. Adenike is doing well for herself. She’s certainly a force to reckon with all d best to her. We @DisinctFH love her and wish her the very best.

Ademola Adedamola, a fast rising entrepreneur, a graduate and the CEO of Ademola Make-over and Gele tying. She intend to expand bigger and impact her knowledge into other peeps, she said. Twitter handle @adedamola2011

Faith Sarah Williams (FSW) is a graduate of UNILAG. Studied Marine Biology and now fully into make-up. Sarah just started though, her turn off is she feels horrible seeing ladies wearing a wrong make-up. Sarah is to be with and taking make-up as a career is the best thing that makes her happy now. All the best gurl. Follow FSW Instagram @Faithuvic

Olarinde Olawumi is another make-up artist doing well for herself. The CEO of Ola’s make-over. Seems everyone loves the make-up business not for the money as they all say. Wumi, intend to achieve sucess, want to hear her name within and outside the country. Ola’s make-over is here and have come to stay.